15 – Bikes and changes…

Things have been pretty busy and I haven’t kept up with this blog nor my photography…but here’s my last attempt in 2015 at catching up for about three months of negligence.

After the last post (in September), I had a few more trips to the UK – and during one trip which spanned a weekend, I had some time to walk around Crawley’s “high street” and in the middle of a shopping area, there was an interesting old church.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The church was surrounded by grave stones – all of the land around the church was converted to a graveyard – which was both eerie and strange (to me).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It looked like the church was having services, so I didn’t want to be disrespectful and walk around the grave stones, though I did see some dated from the 1700’s and 1800’s.

In all, I probably spent about five weeks traveling to the UK for work in 2015. I’m hoping my travel schedule next year will be more manageable.

Other than that last trip, we’ve gone through some changes at home, or rather, outside the house.

20151107_151854 (Large)

Sara finally got a full-size BMX bike and now, we’re outside and terrorizing the parks and schools whenever the kids have an opportunity. I was hoping she’d be able to do long distance riding so she could at least keep up with me while I run (Matty rode alongside me while I ran distances ranging from 5 miles to 11 miles).  Unfortunately, Sara gets bored on the bike trails, so she insists on being someplace where she could climb around or play on swings every now and then…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fortunately, Matty is easy to please, so while Sara explores, Matty will ride around wherever he can.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Honestly though, they probably spend most of the time chasing each other and generally just having simple fun on their bikes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I often just end up just sitting and watching them…and longing for those simpler times when the most important thing in life was who gets to ride first and who gets to choose where they ride to.

My bike has transformed from my long distance training bike to my weekend commuter – the bike rack is permanently on and I haven’t used my SPD cleats in months. Luckily, I have two-sided pedals – platforms on one side, SPD clips on the other.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

That’s about it for this blog in 2015. There were only 15 posts this year – granted, there were some pretty drastic life changes and significantly more international travel than before.

My photography has suffered quite a bit since my desire to capture moments has taken a back seat to experiencing the moment.

In terms of my photography kit though, I now just have the following:

  • Olympus OM-D EM5
  • Sigma 19/2.8
  • Olympus 45/1.8
  • Olympus 40-150/4-5.6
  • Olympus 35/3.5 macro (with 4/3-t0 m4/3 adapter)
  • Olympus FL-36R flash

I traded my recently-acquired Panasonic 14-42/3.5-5.6 PZ lens for the Olympus 45/1.8 lens, and honestly, I think I got the better end of that trade.

What’s in store for 2016?

I do have a goal, which I intend on fulfilling: I’m going to self-publish a book (or three) by the end of next year.

This was something I’ve been meaning to do for a long time, but I think it’s time that I actually just do it.

Here’s an excerpt from the first chapter:

Alric figured he was a screw-up, which in his fatalistic view, was nothing wrong or shameful. Some people are just born with better skills than others and Alric kind of assumed that he just wasn’t born with any. Alric already settled on the fact that he wouldn’t amount to much and would spend the rest of his life just being Alric – shorter-than-normal, slightly thin due to rations constantly being taken away, Alric. Unlike everyone from his ward, he never aspired to be selected for Generation – he knew that the best and brightest eventually would be selected for Generation Duty, which if you think about it, was the most important duty of all. Procreation and the continuation of the population was a tremendous responsibility and brought with it a host of benefits – your own suite, rations whenever you want them – granted you had to share the suite with at least three or four other girls who were matched with you. Sure, your job was to impregnate them and grow children, but Alric imagined that would get boring after a while.

In any case, the readiness mark on his arm was still yellow, so he wasn’t even ready to procreate. Just like his voice, it would take a few more cycles.

Alric looked down at the directions he scribbled on his slate: go down main Walkway One, left after Ward Three, right after Ward Seven. He had just passed Ward Seven and if he were to go left, he’d just go back to the other Wards. If he were to go straight, he’s go into a commissary and as hungry as he was, he didn’t hear the announcement for Ward Thirty yet. Alric checked his pocket for his ID, and he had it, and it still said Ward Thirty.

To his right was a walkway that was better lit than the others – there were definitely more torches overhead compared to where he had just come from. Alric turned and moved as quickly as he could down this hallway and at the end, there were double doors that were simply labeled, “Air Quality – entry only to assigned personnel.” He pushed on the doors and they wouldn’t move. He would have tried the door handles but they were nonexistent. So, he knocked and stepped back.

The story and subject matter are probably best described as sci-fi; it should be noted that my favorite sci-fi genre is post-apocalyptic, near-future, and alternate reality.

I will occasionally post teasers on this blog.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s